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20121201
20121231
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 90 (some duplicates have been removed)
city facing rising sea levels and the next big storm. >> if sandy were to come close or directly into norfolk i think we'd all be in big trouble. >> brown: we assess the latest diplomatic moves to end syria's war, as secretary of state hillary clinton meets with russia's foreign minister. >> woodruff: and ray suarez has the story of a program that aims to put students at low-achieving schools on a path to high school graduation. >> we're here to make things better. we're here to tutor kids. we're here to make sure that they stay on track. we are here to make sure that they graduate. we want to prepare them for high school. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for
letters to these fledgling congregations in the cities of the greek east. >> paul alludes in a number of his letters to the message that he would have communicated verbally, probably. he emphasizes two things: on the one hand, very clearly the importance of the death and resurrection of jesus; on the other hand, he also emphasizes the... the importance of understanding the end time and the immediacy of the end time, and that one must be prepared for it. and the way one prepares for it is to be good. we find a lot of ethics in... in paul. and it's around this issue of how one... one lives in anticipation of the end time that's just around the corner, for paul. >> narrator: the death and resurrection of jesus lie at the very heart of paul's preaching, but it is a story that pre-dates paul and goes back to the first followers of jesus in jerusalem. >> ( dramatized ): joseph took the body and wrapped it in a clean linen cloth, and laid it in his own new tomb, which he had hewn in the rock. >> the movement that originated around jesus must have suffered a traumatic setback with his death.
of a glorious past. and some parts of the city bustle with holiday energy. but not far away: closed-up storefronts. and, further below the surface, this: a health clinic set up by the greek branch of the international aid group, doctors of the world to serve the country's newly poor. dr. nikitis kanakis is its director. >> brown: kanakis group, in fact, had to cut back some of its work in africa because of the needs at home. here in perama, unemployment tops 50% as the shrinking economy has crippled much of the local shipping industry. at the same time, the deeply indebted greek government has made dramatic budget cuts, including to health benefits. the combination has left many here without access to private or public care. and that's meant a stunning rise in disease and mortality rates. >> brown: economists, of course, speak of a different kind of necessary medicine: the kind a deeply indebted nation must take. the price for living and consuming well beyond its means for far too long. >> the medicine is necessary. it was, though, delivered very abruptly. >> brown: as a government
jobs are in consumer banking. the move comes less than two months since a shakeup at citi ousting former c.e.o., vikram pandit. he was succeeded by michael corbat. the bank nearly collapsed during the crisis and ultimately received bailouts totaling $45 billion, money that citi has since repaid. roben farzhad has long watched the changes at citi for bloomberg "businessweek" and joins us again tonight. roben, welcome. today we heard that stocks soared on the news of these layoffs. what does that tell us about what was going on at citi? >> it's sad, actually. citigroup is know-- you could say the financial crisis is over but in the throes of an existential crisis. it doesn't know what it wants to be. investors have been clamoring for a while for citigroup to simplify, to shed payrolls, to be good at something. it does everything, but it isn't market leading, necessarily, in any one category. and by and large, they got the layoffs, at least the beginning round of layoffs that they wanted today. >> ifill: we know many of these layoffs are noin the u.s., but i assume part of the relati
. >> woodruff: from boston, hari sreenivasan reports on a city- wide effort to keep kids engaged in education through meaningful work experiences. >> we're starting at the very early ages to try to help young people speak. that is a direct relationship to being successful in school and being successful in your life >> woodruff: and we close out 2012 with two takes on history, first, a look at the emancipation proclamation on the eve of the 150th anniversary of president lincoln's action to end slavery and the civil war. >> woodruff: plus michael beschloss and richard norton smith talk about potential historical turning points of the past year. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station
,013. indianapolis will be the first major american city to replace all city-owned cars with electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles. the program announced today calls for completing the switch by 2025. the city also plans to phase in fire trucks and other heavy vehicles that run on compressed natural gas. officials said they're asking auto makers to create plug-in hybrid police cars, which don't yet exist. retiring u.s. senator joe lieberman said goodbye to the senate today, with an appeal for principled compromise. he warned that gridlock is preventing progress on a host of problems. lieberman ran as the democratic vice presidential nominee in 2000. all told, he spent 24 years in the senate, first as a democrat, and since 2006, as an independent. a pantheon of music legends takes the stage tonight in new york, raising money for those hit hardest by hurricane sandy. the program for the "12-12-12" concert includes paul mccartney, bruce springsteen, the rolling stones, kanye west and alicia keys, among many others. the concert and telethon could reach two billion people on radio and t.v., in movi
't belong in the streets of our city. >> woodruff: we assess the public policy questions raised by the shooting about access to guns, mental health issues, and more. >> ifill: hari sreenivasan reports from newtown on a community in mourning. >> woodruff: and as parents around the country nervously dropped their children off at school today, jeffrey brown talks to a psychiatrist and a school psychologist about what to say and not to say in times of crisis. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: a holiday season that should have
. and inside syria, rebels captured a second major military base near the northern city of aleppo. new details have emerged from south africa on the health of former president nelson mandela. the government announced today that military doctors are treating him for a recurring lung infection. mandela is 94 years old. he's been hospitalized since saturday, but officials said he is responding to treatment. an investigation of paying pro football players for causing injuries took a sharp new turn today. the man appointed to hear appeals, former nfl commissioner paul tagliabue, voided the suspensions of four current and former new orleans saints. tagliabue said actions by team coaches and others had contaminated the case. he did agree that three of the players should be fined. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to ray. >> suarez: cairo is the scene of mass rallies again tonight. demonstrators on both sides of the upcoming referendum are on the streets of the capital. their refrain was "bread, freedom and sharia" or islamic law from supporters of president mohammed morsi in cairo.
city, i think we can do this. >> i do have a cynicism in me that says, you know, if we lose momentum we're going to be footnoted to the next horrible tragedy that unfolds. a month from now, two months from now. i hate that feeling. it's really cynical and a horrible thing to think. but it seemslike that's sort of been the pattern over the last several years. >> i support responsible gun ownership. i've gone to firing ranges. i've fired guns. i don't own a gun. i would be happy to listen to responsible gun owners as well. i don't support banning all guns. just weapons that can just keech shooting and shooting and shooting. >> and i feel the same way. i grew up learning to shoot with my father. it's one of the few things we did together. >> the fact is we need to start enforcing laws we have. we need to make stronger laws. particularly garding these high-powered weapons. that are brutally efficient at killing people. because there's no need for civilians to have those. i don't think we need to ban guns. i think we need to find the right balance. it may not just be the guns. it might also
.c.'s mayor and city council. next major tax break, state and local taxes. deductible in full from taxable income. this costs the federal government about $47 billion a year, almost 5% of the annual deficit. so what's the objection to getting rid of the state and local tax deduction? >> the deductions for state and local taxes lowers the cost the citizens are paying those state and local taxes. it means those governments can charge higher tax than they otherwise would. take that away they'll have to lower their revenues at a time when they're in trouble themselves or it's going raise the cost to the citizens who won't be happy about it. >> reporter: as lawmakers rush to rescue the economy from the fiscal cliff emergency, they have focused -- as have we thus far -- on itemized deductions. but when it comes to tax breaks or preferences, says robert... >> not just deductions. it includes things like exclusion from income, the biggest one of which is the we don't tax you on the premiums your employer pays for the health insurance we get. much bigger than anything on the deduction side. it's no
the day. under the ever-watchful eye of president assad, reading lessons for children in a city, a country at war with itself. what kind of things are these little girls seeing beyond the school gates? >> ( translated ): we as educators don't support one side or the other. our concern is for the child to learn. so we keep the school open and help with their fears. we can't do as much as before, but the key thing is to try and deal with their anxiety. joarpt up down, left, right, 2, 3, 4-- out in the playground it's a p . e. lesson, exercises including run to the wall and back. here, the running is for fun, but beyond the school walls, a smell or moar can la anywhere, any time. running can be a matter of life and death. for obvious reasons, the killing of small children and teachers in and around school buildings is pretty near the top of the news agenda at the moment, so it is in this educational district and the one next door alone, in the past two weeks, 35 children and two teachers have been killed. the security building next to the school was car bombed recently, leaving a staff candid
city talks adopted today inviting opposition to start identifying areas where we can agree how to amend that constitution. >> ifill: the opposition has lost every battle that it has had against the president since he took over last june, are you two fractured, do you owe pose him? >> we have been fractured in the past. don't forget that after the uprising, after the revolution, the brotherhood has been underground for 780 years, it has been reaching out to the grass roots providing social services. they have excellent connection with average joe, if you like. opposition has been six months old. has been established in the last few months has been fractured. right now i think only in last month we had been getting together, establishing a united front. i think we're moving -- gaining ground right now. if you compare referendum a year and a half ago we've got 23%. this time we got 36%. we do hope that as the coming parliamentary election we can get majority. if we do that we finally would be able to correct the past of the revolution that focused on human dignity guarantees of freedom.
community programs in nevada city, which provides services for the county's mentally ill, including those who fall under laura's law, and many who don't. some of the patients, like 36- year-old jonathan maurer-- here for a long acting injection for his paranoid schizophrenia, and to meet with a psychiatrist-- resent being ordered to receive treatment. today maurer accepts voluntary treatment, for his paranoia; though he claims to have been mistreated previously. >> they gave me a catheter, and strapped me down naked on the hospital bed and then sedated me. they strip you of all your rights. i just don't see how they expect to logically assume that treating people with violence is going to cure violence. >> reporter: but debra simmons-- mother of a very disturbed son who gets treatment here-- praises laura's law and involuntary treatment for essentially saving his life. she didn't want his name used. >> he gets angry and agitated, doesn't sleep, doesn't eat, just goes through a whole cycle of events that just kind of spiral downward until he's become a concern to the society if he's out in
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 90 (some duplicates have been removed)